nickturse:

A truly humbling quote about my forthcoming book, Kill Anything that Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam, by retired Army colonel and Vietnam veteran Andrew Bacevich.

nickturse:

A truly humbling quote about my forthcoming book, Kill Anything that Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam, by retired Army colonel and Vietnam veteran Andrew Bacevich.

"Think of 2013 as the Year Zero in the battle over climate change, one in which we are going to have to win big, or lose bigger. This is a terrible thing to say, but not as terrible as the reality that you can see in footage of glaciers vanishing, images of the entire surface of the Greenland Ice Shield melting this summer, maps of Europe’s future in which just being in southern Europe when the heat hits will be catastrophic, let alone in more equatorial realms."

Rebecca Solnit, 2013 as Year Zero for Us — and Our Planet | TomDispatch

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"“Unhappy is the land that needs a hero,” Galileo famously says in Bertold Brecht’s play about that renegade scientist, but at least, the hero has the possibility of doing something about that unhappiness, as, for instance, the Sierra Club has. It’s led the fight against big coal, helping prevent 168 coal-powered plants from opening and retiring 125 dirty coal plants. The aim of its Beyond Coal campaign is to retire all 522 such plants in the United States, which would be a colossal triumph."

Rebecca Solnit, 2013 as Year Zero for Us — and Our Planet | TomDispatch

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"

We now, for instance, have a drone base in the Seychelles, an archipelago that evidently needs an infusion of money. Unless you had the dough for a high-end wedding in the middle of the Indian Ocean or a vacation in “paradise,” you’ve probably never heard of the place.

No matter. You’re still paying for the deployment of 82 people to those islands to fly and land crash-prone drones in our now endless “covert” robotic air wars in the Greater Middle East and Africa. With the so-called fiscal cliff now eternally on the media horizon, there’s been reporting recently on how your tax dollars are being spent, but do you have the faintest idea what it actually costs you to garrison the globe? No? Then you’re in good company, and the Pentagon certainly isn’t interested in telling you either.

"

Tom Engelhardt, TomDispatch.com (via nickturse)

(via nickturse)

"You say the littlest thing and they disappear you."

— An unemployed man named Luke speaking about rebel fighters in the Democratic Republic of Congo who are, according to the New York Times, “going house to house arresting people, many of whom have not been seen again by their families.”  Read the full story at “As Rebels Gain, Congo Again Slips Into Chaos” - NYTimes.com (via nickturse)

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"Do you know what a naval blockade means for the people in Gaza? There’s no food for a few days. For example, suppose there’s an attack in Netanya, so they impose a naval blockade for four days on the entire Strip. No seagoing vessel can leave. A Dabur patrol boat is stationed at the entrance to the port, if they try to go out, within seconds the soldiers shoot at the bow and even deploy attack helicopters to scare them. We did a lot of operations with attack helicopters — they don’t shoot much because they prefer to let us deal with that, but they’re there to scare people, they circle over their heads. All of a sudden there’s a Cobra right over your head, stirring up the wind and throwing everything around."

— An Israeli Navy veteran talks about an operation off the coast of Gaza, from Oded Na’aman, Is Gaza Outside Israel? | TomDispatch (via nickturse)

(via nickturse)

"Do you know what a naval blockade means for the people in Gaza? There’s no food for a few days. For example, suppose there’s an attack in Netanya, so they impose a naval blockade for four days on the entire Strip. No seagoing vessel can leave. A Dabur patrol boat is stationed at the entrance to the port, if they try to go out, within seconds the soldiers shoot at the bow and even deploy attack helicopters to scare them. We did a lot of operations with attack helicopters — they don’t shoot much because they prefer to let us deal with that, but they’re there to scare people, they circle over their heads. All of a sudden there’s a Cobra right over your head, stirring up the wind and throwing everything around."

— An Israeli Navy veteran talks about an operation off the coast of Gaza, from Oded Na’aman, Is Gaza Outside Israel? | TomDispatch (via nickturse)

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"It was a battalion operation. They spread out over the whole village, took over the school, smashed the locks, the classrooms. One was used as the investigation room for the Shin Bet, one room for detainees, one for the soldiers to rest. We went in house by house, banging on the door at two in the morning. The family’s dying of fear, the girls are peeing in their pants with fear. We go into the house and turn everything upside down."

— An Israeli soldier from the Kfir Brigade talks about a 2009 military operation in Nablus district in the West Bank, from Oded Na’aman, Is Gaza Outside Israel? | TomDispatch

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"It was a fancy thing to see, a startling thing. It was a moment of truth, too, because American civilians and ground troops didn’t know American bombers were engaged in saturation bombing. It was kept a secret until very close to the end of the war. One reason they burned down Dresden is that they’d already burned down everything else. You know: “What’re we going to do tonight?” Here was everybody all set to go, and Germany still fighting, and this machinery for burning down cities was being used. It was a secret, burning down cities—boiling pisspots and flaming prams. There was all this hokum about the Norden bomb sight. You’d see a newsreel showing a bombardier with an MP on either side of him holding a drawn .45. That sort of nonsense, and hell, all they were doing was just flying over cities, hundreds of airplanes, and dropping everything. When I went to the University of Chicago after the war the guy who interviewed me for admission had bombed Dresden. He got to that part of my life story and he said, “Well, we hated to do it.” The comment sticks in my mind."

— It’s Kurt Vonnegut’s birthday, today. It’s also Veterans Day, which is a kind of apt confluence because he was a veteran of World War II, a former prisoner of war, a survivor of The Battle of Bulge (as was my grandfather), a survivor of the bombing of Dresden. This Paris Review interview (or rather combination of a number of interviews) with Vonnegut is powerful and detailed in his accounts of his experiences in World War II. (via thepoliticalnotebook)

killanythingthatmoves:

Galleys are in… blurbs to come… publication in January 2013

killanythingthatmoves:

Galleys are in… blurbs to come… publication in January 2013

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